429 U.S. 492 (1977)

The police officers called Defendant, a parolee, and asked him to report to the police station.  Upon arrival, the officers informed Defendant that he was not under arrest, and then asked him questions about a burglary.  Defendant confessed to the crime and was then released pending review of his case.

Defendant later challenged the questioning as a violation of his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination because the officers did not read him the Miranda warnings before questioning him.

The Supreme Court of the United States held that the Miranda warnings were not required because Defendant had come to the police station voluntarily, was informed that he was not under arrest, and had not been restricted in his freedom to leave.

See also Miranda v. Arizona.

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