An abbreviation for et alii, “and others.”

“The abbreviation ‘et al’ encompasses both singular and plural and commonly means ‘and another’ or ‘and other.'”  F.P. Baugh, Inc. v. Little Lake Lumber Co., 297 F.2d 692, 695 (9th Cir. 1961).

“A bill of exceptions should on its face affirmatively and unequivocally show who are the parties thereto, and it has been repeatedly held by this court that the abbreviation ‘et al.’ when occurring in a bill of exceptions after the name of a party therein designated, can not be held to include any other person who figured as a party in the trial court.  In Orr v. Webb, 112 Ga. 806, it was held: ‘A bill of exceptions should, on its face, affirmatively and unequivocally show who are the parties thereto; and in strictly good practice the plaintiff or plaintiffs and the defendant or defendants therein should be expressly designated as such eis nominibus. * * * The abbreviation ‘et al.,’ when used in a bill of exceptions, can not be held to designate any person or persons.’ Respecting designation of the parties, the rule is well settled by the decisions of this court that the recitals in a bill of exceptions should in every instance be sufficiently clear and explicit to enable the officer into whose hands it may be placed for service to determine beyond peradventure precisely whom he is expected to serve with a copy of the same.”  Chandler v. Foote & Davies Co., 210 Ga. 370 (1954).

“Plaintiff used the abbreviation “et al.” inappropriately.  A plaintiff must name all defendants in his complaint (an amended complaint supersedes the initial complaint).  Failing to name all defendants in his complaint denies the court jurisdiction over the unnamed defendants.”  Stewart v. U.S., 2008 WL 2563238, at *2 (W.D. Wash. June 25, 2008).

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